Below the victims are listed. Use the clues to figure out if your victim could be the one in our case!

  • is an Aboriginal totem
  • nocturnal
  • Is endangered in Commonwealth Legislation
  • lives in colony


Black Headed Python

Lives in: Embley River, Dampier Creek, Katherine River, Endeavour River, Macarthur River, Nogoa River


Boab Tree

Lives in: Katherine River

Bridled Nail-Tail Wallaby

Lives in: Nogoa River


The Bridle Nailtail Wallaby from Central Queensland was thought to be extinct, but was rediscovered in the 1970's. This macropod is being successfully bred in captivity and is being released onto private land as well as into National Parks. The Bridle Nailtail Wallaby is known locally as “flash jack” because of its beautiful colouring.
Bridled Nailtail Wallaby.bmp
Bridled Nailtail Wallaby.bmp
Bridled Nailtail Wallaby.bmp
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(Heather & Anastasia)

Diamond Firetail Finch

Lives in: Kiewa River

Dollarbird

Lives in: Nogoa River, Embley River, Endeavour River, Kiewa River, Katherine River, Macarthur River, Hawesbury River

Echidna

Lives in: Nogoa River, Embley River, Endeavour River, Kiewa River, Katherine River, Macarthur River, Hawesbury River, Dampier Creek, Lake Cowan, Pentecost River,

Green Tree Frog

Lives in: Nogoa River, Embley River, Endeavour River, Katherine River, Macarthur River, Dampier Creek, Lake Cowan, Pentecost River,

Green Sea Turtle

Lives in: Nogoa River, Embley River, Endeavour River, Kiewa River, Katherine River, Macarthur River, Hawesbury River, Dampier Creek, Lake Cowan, Pentecost River,

Northern Quoll

Lives in: Embley River, Endeavour River, Dampier Creek, Pentecost River,
Northen quoll gets eaten or killed by the villain cane toad.They also get poisoned[DDT].Made.Daniel.The northen quoll dies from eating cane toads.
It is known that Cane Toads colonised Cape York between the mid 1980s to the mid 1990s with subsequent crashes in Northern Quoll populations. During 1994–95, the disappearance of Northern Quolls was reported at two monitored sites in northern Cape York Peninsula within three months of the arrival of Cane Toads, with no subsequent population return observed (Burnett 1997). Northern Quolls had previously been common at both these sites.
The removal, degradation and fragmentation of Northern Quoll habitat is usually the consequence of development actions such as mining, transport infrastructure, offshore petroleum or gas processing facilities or through agricultural activities such as land clearing, pasture improvement or grazing.
It is suggested that Northern Quolls may be vulnerable to extensive frequent fires now characteristic of much of northern Australia. One cause postulated for the decline of Northern Quolls is predation of the species following the removal of ground cover by fire which increases the species vulnerability to predators such as Dingos, Cats and raptors.Son.
Northern Quolls are omnivores. Their diet consists of invertebrates, plants, small mammals, birds, reptiles, frogs and bird eggs. They also scavenge road kill with fatal consequences sometimes as they are struck by cars themselves
Mostly nocturnal, Northern Quolls and are both terrestrial (land-dwelling) and arboreal (tree-dwelling). Males and females are solitary and maintain their own territories. They set up various dens in anything from rock crevices and tree hollows to termite mounds and roofs of houses.
Northern Quoll numbers are declining. Their predators include dingos, feral cats, snakes, owls and kites. They are also killed by domestic dogs, motor vehicles and pesticide poisoning. The spread of the Cane Toad into Northern Territory has led to local extinctions of Northern Quolls. The quolls die after eating the poisonous Cane Toad.
Perth Zoo’s Northern Quolls are on display in the Nocturnal House.
Quolls are sometimes called native cats. Unfortunately, they have suffered from the introduction of the domestic cat. There are four species of quoll in Australia – the Western Quoll (or Chuditch), the Northern Quoll, the Spotted-tailed (or Tiger) Quoll and the Eastern Quoll. Before European settlement they were found across Australia but now they are found in restricted areas and most are threatened with extinction.
The Northern Quoll now occurs in five regional populations across Queensland, the Northern Territory and Western Australia both on the mainland and on offshore islands.(Emilia)

Orange Spotted Ladybird

Lives in: Nogoa River, Embley River, Endeavour River, Kiewa River, Katherine River, Macarthur River, Hawesbury River, Dampier Creek, Lake Cowan, Pentecost River,

Red Headed Honey-Eater

Lives in: Embley River, Endeavour River, Macarthur River

Bilby

Lives in: Dampier Creek

Sturt Desert Pea

Lives in: Dampier Creek, Lake Cowan, Pentecost River,

Sugar Glider

Lives in: Nogoa River, Embley River, Endeavour River, Kiewa River, Katherine River, Macarthur River, Hawesbury River, During the cold season, drought, or rainy nights, a sugar glider's activity is reduced. This is usually seen due to restlessness . In the winter season or drought, there is a decrease in food supply, which is a challenge for this marsupial because of the energy cost for the maintenance of its metabolism (the way it's body works),locomotion (movement), and thermoregulation (temperatures). With energetic restrictions, the sugar glider will enter into daily laziness for 2–23 hours while in rest phase. However, before entering sleeping, a sugar glider will reduce activity and body temperature normally in order to lower energy spending and avoid sleeping.
Habbitat
Sugar gliders can be found throughout the northern and eastern parts of mainland Australia, and in Tasmania, Papua New Guinea, and Indonesia. They can be found in any forest where there is food supply but are commonly found in forests with eucalyptus trees. They are [[/wiki/Nocturnal|nocturnal]], meaning they sleep in their [[/wiki/Nest|nests]] during the day and are active at night. At night, they hunt for insects and small [[/wiki/Vertebrates|vertebrates]] and feed on the sweet [[/wiki/Sap|sap]] of certain species of [[/wiki/Eucalyptus|eucalyptus]], [[/wiki/Acacia|acacia]] and gum trees.[6] The sugar glider is named for its preference for nectarous foods and its ability to glide through the air, much like a [[/wiki/Flying_squirrel|flying squirrel]].[6][7]

When suitable [[/wiki/Habitat|habitats]] are present, sugar gliders can be seen 1 per 1,000 square metres provided that there are tree hollows available for shelter. They live in groups of up to eight adults, plus the current season's young, all sharing a nest and defending their territory, an example of [[/wiki/Helpers_at_the_nest|helping at the nest]]. A dominant adult male will mark his territory and members of the group with saliva and a scent produced by separate glands on the forehead and chest. Intruders who lack the appropriate scent marking are expelled violently.[6[[home#cite_note-dpiw.tas.gov.au-5|]]](Maddie)

Ulysses Butterfly

Lives in: Nogoa River, Embley River, Endeavour River